Training for Doctoral Research

Innbundet / 2009 / Engelsk

Produktdetaljer

ISBN13
9781905763122
Publisert
2009
Utgiver
Vendor
St Jerome Publishing
Aldersnivå
05, UP
Språk
Product language
Engelsk
Format
Product format
Innbundet
Sider
194
Vekt
272 gr
Høyde
234 mm
Bredde
156 mm
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Training for Doctoral Research

Innbundet / 2009 / Engelsk
Following the rapid expansion of translation studies as an emergent (inter-)discipline over recent decades, demand for doctoral research opportunities is now growing fast in many countries. At the same time, doctoral training packages of a generic nature have been elaborated and refined at many universities, drawing on long traditions of doctoral research in established disciplines. A degree of consensus no doubt exists on such matters as the need for rigor, method and the generation of new knowledge. Beyond that, however, there are a host of issues specific to translation and interpreting studies that remain under-researched and under-discussed. Contributors to this special issue encourage reflection on a range of issues in ways that foster further debate and collaboration on the development of doctoral studies within the field. A number of concrete proposals are offered that could be adapted to local situations in different countries and academic settings. While some of the contributions adopt a mainly empirical stance, others adopt a broad perspective on training, citing examples of widely differing projects. Two contributors offer insights from personal experience of doctoral study while another describes the organization of doctoral work within the conceptual framework of a research group. All consider training from the angle of student needs and offer concrete suggestions for ensuring that doctoral candidates are equipped with the guidance, concepts, methods and tools required for success.
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Encourages reflection on a range of issues in ways that foster further debate and collaboration on the development of doctoral studies within the field. This book describes the organization of doctoral work within the conceptual framework of a research group.
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Training for Doctoral Research: Contents Research Training in Translation Studies, pp. 1-12 Ian Mason (Heriot-Watt University, UK) Doctoral work in translation studies has grown in volume over recent years, not only in Europe and America but also worldwide. A concomitant trend has been the requirement for research training, either within or as preparation for doctoral programmes, and many generic and discipline-specific training packages are now offered in a wide variety of institutions. But what are the characteristics of doctoral work in the broad field of translation studies and what kinds of area-specific training are appropriate? In a domain characterized by methodological heterogeneity and beset by problems of achieving consensus on what constitutes its object of study, is there a common core that could inform the design of a training course for doctoral research in translation studies? In presenting the contributions to this special issue of ITT, this introductory article argues that, provided research designs are clear, consistent and internally coherent, there will be no need to force individual studies into a common mould. Correspondingly, the goal of mutual understanding and respect will best be served by introducing doctoral students to a full range of theoretical perspectives, empirical tools and methods, among which they will be enabled to perceive the relative scope and effectiveness of those they have selected. Training Translation Researchers: An Approach Based on Models and Best Practice, pp. 13-35 Josep Marco (Universitat Jaume I, Castello, Spain) A general issue for doctoral research training is what a comprehensive module in research methods in translation studies might (or should) include. This article attempts to answer that question in two complementary ways: by identifying a number of research models in translation studies and by providing examples of best practice within them, to be discussed and analyzed in training sessions. The models are: textual-descriptivist, cognitive, culturalist and sociological. Instances of best practice are published reports of research, regarded as effective, efficient and representative of the research model in question. The description of each model is accompanied by examples of practical training, involving the application of concepts and methods to new research topics and environments. The Case Study Method in Translation Studies, pp. 37-56 A ebnem Susam-Sarajeva (University of Edinburgh, UK) The objective of this article is to initiate a discussion on the definition, use and outcomes of case study research within translation studies. The article argues that the method is widespread in the discipline, especially at postgraduate level, and yet its characteristics and requirements are rather taken for granted and not necessarily elaborated on. The first part of the article looks at the definitions of case study in the social sciences and its uses within translation studies; emphasizes the importance of distinguishing between case and context; and delivers an overview of the differences between single- and multiple-case studies. The second part concentrates on the relationships between case studies and generalizations, with a view to understanding how to achieve valid and useful conclusions out of the (mostly single) cases prevalent in the discipline. It is the author's hope that the article will assist new researchers, as well as their supervisors, to determine the requirements of this particular method as well as the best course of action to achieve generalizable results in their theses. Research Methodology in Specialized Genres for Translation Purposes, pp. 57-77 Anabel Borja, Isabel Garcia Izquierdo and Vicent Montalt (Universitat Jaume I, Spain) This article proposes a methodology for the organization of doctoral research in specialized translation. Emphasis is placed on the need to choose the research methods that are best suited to each case and to clearly define the phases and resources to be used in the research. This process of selection must be based on careful consideration of what is to be researched, why and, above all, how to go about it. The concept of text genre is proposed as the main organizing principle of the research, since its multifaceted character shouldl allow different theoretical models to be integrated into the analysis. This article therefore aims to serve as a guide both to doctoral students in the field of specialized translation and to academic staff who are supervising or guiding these students. Elements of Doctoral Training: The Logic of the Research Process, Research Design and the Evaluation of Research Quality, pp. 79-106 Sandra Halverson (University of Bergen, Norway) A general curriculum in research methodology for doctoral students in translation studies should focus on the underlying logic of the research process, including delimitation of the research question, choice of research design for empirical studies and evaluation of research quality. In this paper, these elements are briefly introduced, and means of working on them in doctoral seminars are suggested. One of the teaching methods advised is working through a sample research case and this approach is illustrated in the paper, using the gravitational pull hypothesis (Halverson 2003). The emphasis is on illustrating a dynamic research process as a means of teaching about the commitments that research involves at various levels, about the intellectual and practical challenges that emerge, about the quality requirements that pertain and about how to steer a course through unknown terrain with the navigational tools at our disposal. Doctoral Work in Translation Studies as an Interdisciplinary Mutual Learning Process, pp. 107-28 Anne Burns, Mira Kim and Christian M.I.M. Matthiessen (Macquarie University, Australia) The focus of this paper is on the doctoral research training experienced by one of the authors and the ways in which the diverse linguistic and disciplinary perspectives of her two supervisors (co-authors of this paper) mediated the completion of her study. The doctoral candidate is a professional translator/interpreter and translation teacher. The paper describes why and how she identified her research area and then focused on the major research questions in collaboration with her two supervisors, who brought their differing perspectives from the field of linguistics to this translation research, even though they are not translators by profession or disciplinary background and do not speak Korean. In addition, the discussion considers the focus, purpose and theoretical orientation of the research itself (which addressed questions of readability in translated English-Korean texts through detailed analysis of a corpus and implications for professional translator training) as well as the supervisory and conceptual processes and practices involved. The authors contend that doctoral research of this kind can be seen as a mutual learning process and that inter-disciplinary research can make a contribution not only to the development of rigorous research in the field of translation studies but also to the other disciplinary fields involved. Training for the Viva Examination: A Translation Studies Student Perspective, pp. 129-142 Sue-Ann Harding (University of Manchester, UK) Myth and mystery often surround the doctoral examination process, not just for students but also for supervisors and examiners. Yet it need not be so. Recent publications informed by current empirical research and addressed primarily to doctoral students but also relevant to both supervisors and examiners discuss the nature and purposes of the viva and offer detailed strategies for viva preparation. For one Translation Studies doctoral student in her final year, the idea that mystery could be exchanged for sound and informed preparation has proved empowering. This paper, in a reflection on that empowering experience, discusses a selection of resources on viva culture and preparation; the integral connection between written thesis and oral examination; the opportunities for training and practice in the oral communication of ideas, arguments and conclusions; the opportunities for acculturation and induction into the academic community or 'tribe' during doctoral study, which culminate in the viva; and the complex nature of the oral examination, which requires complex, imaginative, proactive preparation rather than a search for simplistic solutions. The paper includes a number of concrete examples and useful suggestions for viva preparation, relevant to both staff and students, and applicable throughout the doctoral programme. FEATURES SECTION Coherence and Clarity of Objectives in Doctoral Projects: A Research Design Workshop, pp. 143-164 Maeve Olohan and Mona Baker (University of Manchester, UK) Successful supervision of doctoral research is a defining feature and prerequisite to the survival of any research group within the academy. Within translation studies, unlike sociology for instance, relatively few scholars have acquired extensive experience in research supervision, and the discipline as a whole has so far paid little attention to examining the design of research projects at doctoral level. An attempt is made to address this gap by focusing on the design and coherence of doctoral research projects that involve the analysis of translation or interpreting data, drawing on concrete examples of current doctoral projects at the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester. A broad overview of the UK context, in terms of increased monitoring and formalization of research training in recent years, is followed by a detailed discussion and exemplification of design issues in the initial stages of a doctoral project. The paper ends with an outline of a research design workshop for Year 1 and Year 2 students. Although equally valid in many other contexts, the workshop is designed within the context of doctoral study in the UK. BOOK REVIEWS Paul Kussmaul: Verstehen und A bersetzen. Ein Lehr- und Arbeitsbuch [Comprehension and Translation: A Reader and Textbook] Reviewed by Mary An Kenny (Institute of Technology Blanchardstown, Ireland) Anabel Borja Albi: Estrategias, materiales y recursos para la traduccion juridica: ingles-espanol [Strategies, Materials and Resources for Legal Translation: English-Spanish]. (Textbook and teacher's/self-learner's guide) Reviewed by Leo Hickey (University of Salford, UK) Alison Cook-Sather: Education Is Translation: A Metaphor for Change in Learning and Teaching Reviewed by Lillian Depaula (State University of New York at Binghamton, USA) Jody Byrne: Technical Translation: Usability Strategies for Translating Technical Documentation Reviewed by Rosario Durao (Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal) Dorothy Kenny and Kyongjoo Ryou (eds): Across Boundaries: International Perspectives on Translation Studies Reviewed by Michal Borodo (Kazimierz Wielki University, Poland) THESIS ABSTRACT lvaro Echeverri: Metacognition, apprentissage actif et traduction: l'apprenant de traduction, agent de sa propre formation [Metacognition, Active Learning and Translation: The Translation Learner as an Agent of His/Her Own Instruction], Universite de Montreal, Canada
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Produktdetaljer

ISBN13
9781905763122
Publisert
2009
Utgiver
Vendor
St Jerome Publishing
Aldersnivå
05, UP
Språk
Product language
Engelsk
Format
Product format
Innbundet
Sider
194
Vekt
272 gr
Høyde
234 mm
Bredde
156 mm
Se alle
Forfatter

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